tina thieme brown

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Inspiration surrounds me in the patchwork fields and wooded rustic roads, where plants and animals inhabit the magical landscape in Montgomery County’s Agricultural Reserve. 

The connection starts in my own backyard. I live in the shadow of Sugarloaf Mountain, where I researched and created art for two Sugarloaf Mountain books. This is a wonderful refuge filled with native plant and wildlife diversity.  

I share this connection in a variety of Art & Nature workshop locations: The National Bonsai and Penjing Museum, Audubon Naturalist Society, Brookside Gardens, the U.S. Botanic Garden on the Smithsonian Mall, Walden Pond, and in my art studio.  I enjoy teaching art as a way to observe the natural world. I hold a BFA, MFA, and MLA from Washington University in St. Louis.

Over the years, a commitment to protecting habitats from the tropics to the tundra has focused my art in field stations, from the Tropical Rainforest in Costa Rica to the Alaska coastline following the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill.  That work opened my eyes to the importance of connecting with nature in our own backyard, so that we can understand the dynamic habitats near and far.I hope you will join me in the studio or outside for an art and nature adventure.

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Tina Thieme Brown vitae (2017) - PDF

  • School of Botanical Art, Brookside Gardens.

  • USDA Natural History Coursework

  • Master of Liberal Arts, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 1991.

  • Foreign language study at the University of Arizona in Guadalajara, Mexico 1991.

  • Master of Fine Arts, Printmaking and Painting, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 1987.

  • Study abroad with the Glasgow School of Art, Scotland 1986.

  • Bachelor of Fine Arts, Graphic Communication, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 1982.

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I know I can’t paint a flower.
I cannot paint the sun on a bright summer morning,
but maybe in terms of paint color I can convey to you my experience of the flower or the experience that makes the flower significant to me.
— Georgia O'Keefe, 1930